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Outdoorlife4fun Launches Outdoor Social

Outdoorlife4fun Launches Outdoor Social

Outdoor Social is a great way to meet friends and keep up on what they are doing. Once you add a friend to your Outdoor Social friend list you will always know when they are adding things to their blog or updating their profile. Join Outdoor Social groups to meet people like you, or browse the profiles to find new friends. Outdoor Social’s classmates and co-worker search is good for finding friends too.

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With Outdoor Social, you can Keep Track Of Friends, create a Photo Album, Videos, Music, Blog Merge and Search and Browse.

Why Outdoor Social?

Outdoor Social can be thought of as your home. It’s a place people can go to leave you a message, browse through your photo collections, or even chat with you while you are online. It can be a great way to keep in contact with friends and family, and even find long lost friends that you haven’t spoken to in years.

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The  Outdoor Social “wall” is where it all happens. This is where you write comments on what you are up to or share photos and articles with your friends. You’ll also see what your friends and family are posting on their wall, and anyone on your friends list can come by and write a comment on your wall. So not only is the Outdoor Social wall a great place to let everyone know you are back from vacation and post trip photos, it is also a place where conversations are started.

Be a part of this revolution by liking and sharing our new social network. Join our newsletter now.

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LIVOD lets you live stream with friends and family

LIVOD lets you live stream with friends and family

What is LIVOD?

LIVOD is a new app for fun, live streaming with friends & family.  It enables you to broadcast live streamin videos to your followers. They will be instantly notified when you go live and will be able to send you text messages and “likes” while you stream.

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Social Networking

LIVOD users can login with Twitter, share stream on Twitter, follow/un-follow other users within the app. Any other social network can be integrated for login or sharing.

Live Streaming Videos

LIVOD users can broadcast live streaming videos, other users can join and watch them. Recent streams can be also replayed, if other users have missed it when it was live.

 

 

Likes and Chat

LIVOD users can post real-time messages while watching the live stream, bringing the never-seen-before level of communication with the broadcaster. Users can like what they see by tapping on the screen. It will cause a beautiful heart animation to appear for viewers and for the author of the stream.

Push Notifications

Every time a LIVOD users goes online all their followers get push notifications on their devices about that.

What’s next for LIVOD?

We’re very excited to launch the app in the coming weeks. Live video is a rapidly growing market so we’re aiming for LIVOD to lead the way on live streaming by letting people broadcast their experiences to friends & family.

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These are some of the features that LIVOD currently offers but Outdoorlife4fun has already been actively working towards stage 2 and 3 of the app.   Be a part of this revolution by liking and sharing our app. Join our newsletter now.

Outdoorlife4fun Launches New App – LIVOD

Outdoorlife4fun Launches New App – LIVOD

Outdoorlife4fun is doubling down with Go live. Any time. For any reason.  It is  launching a new app called LIVOD.  The download will be made available towards the end of July, 2016 on App Store & Google Play.

LIVOD is a live video streaming app catered around events, recreational activities, sports,  travel excursions, outdoor enthusiasts and much more.  The entire globe has shifted gears with the growing excitement and interest of live happenings.  Outdoorlife4fun wants to provide the opportunity for people to be part of a live event, e.g..  viewing a concert that a friend is at in a different part of the world,  a soccer game in Italy or visiting the Maldives for the very first time, etc.  The list is endless and live video streaming provides the opportunity to be part of an event world wide instantly.

Some of the features with LIVOD are:

phoneSocial Networking

LIVOD users can login with Twitter, share stream on Twitter, follow/un-follow other users within the app. Any other social network can be integrated for login or sharing.

Live Streaming Videos

LIVOD users can broadcast live streaming videos, other users can join and watch them. Recent streams can be also replayed, if other users have missed it when it was live.

Likes and Chat

LIVOD users can post real-time messages while watching the live stream, bringing the never-seen-before level of communication with the broadcaster. Users can like what they see by tapping on the screen. It will cause a beautiful heart animation to appear for viewers and for the author of the stream.

Push Notifications

Every time a LIVOD user goes a online all their followers get push notifications on their devices about that.

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These are some of the features that LIVOD currently offers but Outdoorlife4fun has already been actively working towards stage 2 and 3 of the app.   Be a part of this revolution by liking and sharing our app. Join our newsletter now.

 

 

 

 

 

Compatibility: Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G, iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (3rd generation), iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (4th generation), iPad mini Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad Air Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 2 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad Air 2 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 3 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 4 Wi-Fi + Cellular, 12.9-inch iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular, and 9.7-inch iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular.

Copyright © 2016, Outdoorlife4fun LIVOD.

Experts on Marketing Problem One

Experts on Marketing Problem One

In April 2016, the AMA unveiled its new intellectual agenda founded on seven big problems impacting marketing. These seven problems were identified through the rigorous collaboration of practitioners, researchers and experts. Of course, the nature of the industry shifts rapidly. With this in mind, the AMA is consulting industry experts to continue the discussion.

Do these seven problems capture the full scope of marketing’s changing landscape? Addressing the first problem are seven experts speaking for various parts of the industry. Take quiz below to see how your firm is doing.

David Rogers

Author of The Digital Transformation Playbook and faculty at Columbia Business School

“Is the CMO now the Chief Commercial Officer? For many businesses, the answer is yes. For years, the role of marketers has primarily been to drive demand for existing products and services through customer acquisition and retention. Today, dramatic changes driven by digital and other factors are forcing businesses to look for new sources of growth as old competitive advantages rapidly decline. Marketers are being tasked not just with “selling our stuff,” but with helping a firm transform its value to the market. If the unique role of the marketer is to keep the business focused on its customers, then an essential job of today’s marketer is to discover the next generation of products, services and experiences that can bring value to its customers and earn value for the firm.”

Jonathan Zaback

Chief Growth Officer at The CHR Group

“Need-based targeting is a great way to start. Find the market you want to serve and address its needs. Creating a product in isolation is risky—how do you know it will appeal to anyone but you? The best way to reach a market segment is to understand where that segment “lives.” Brands need to refine their stories, tell them well and communicate them in ways and places where consumers will respond. This is different for each market, but every market is reachable.

We all take positions: in our families, at work,  online. Products need to  do the same. Maybe a product is not for everyone. Is there a spin about the design? Is it organic and non-GMO? Is there a celebrity-endorsement, or is the focus that it is made by a 3D printer in Brooklyn? There are always stories to tell. Find your story and tell it.”

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The Value of Ad Network Technology

The Value of Ad Network Technology

Advertising on dedicated advertising networks can dramatically increase the efficiency of your business’s outreach. By letting publishers address engaged internet audiences and track behavior with specific, indisputable metrics, they make it possible for advertisers to fine-tune campaign methodologies and achieve loftier business goals.

Understanding the Network Model

Online display advertising networks work with publishers to disseminate their marketing content among a broad range of partner advertisers. In the process, they facilitate easy campaign management and simplified interactions with ad hosts by managing particulars like compensation arrangements, content-aware targeting, and data aggregation. 

Google, Microsoft, and other online ad networks have a large list of sites that will display ads, and the advertising technology found on those sites is usually provided (at least in part) by the ad network.

Working with Ad Networks

Much of the inherent value of modern ad network implementations lies in their comprehensive management tools. Network affiliate software routinely incorporates some form of dashboard or interface that makes it easier for companies to manage ongoing campaign content, update ads to reflect strategy changes, and visualize data to determine which methodologies generate the highest ROI. photo-1444653614773-995cb1ef9efa

 

The other nice aspect of advertising network technology (and their adoption by users) is that businesses have numerous networks to choose from, and many target diverse market sectors. Instead of going out, identifying a potential audience, and determining which parts of the Internet they typically frequent, marketers can simply deploy their content to existing aggregations of consumers.

 

 

Gauging the Efficacy of Ad Networks

Ad networks account for a big chunk of the billions spent on digital marketing each year. Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, and other search providers all offer their own affiliated networks complete with keyword analysis and campaign management tools that help users see how their marketing actions impact incoming search traffic.

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Money Talk

Money Talk

RSS Reuters: Business News

Holdouts of the Social Media Age

Holdouts of the Social Media Age

  1. 27FUTURETENSE-master675When Ottessa Moshfegh published her debut novel, “Eileen,” last August, she did so without an online publicity apparatus.

    Vanity Fair noted that Ms. Moshfegh, 34, was an anomaly because she had neither social media profiles nor a website. There wasn’t much personal information floating around about her, either. Ms. Moshfegh had made herself (apart from her work) somewhat un-Googleable.

    As distress and distaste swirl around issues of privacy, exhibitionism and other occupational hazards of social media, a select few holdouts of the tech-savvy age are following Ms. Moshfegh’s example. According to the Pew Research Center, in 2015, 90 percent of American adults ages 18 to 29 used a social networking site; more than three-quarters of those 30 to 49 did. (The percentages for those who have online access were, expectedly, slightly higher.)

    This leaves a stubbornly resistant minority that isn’t focusing its energies on just one or two social media accounts, as is customary for people who find the whole enterprise overwhelming or irrelevant. They are eschewing it completely: sharing zero voluntary personal information on the web.

    A main criticism of social media is its vending of user data to interested buyers. “All it does is provide a vulnerable attack surface to the world,” wrote a pseudonymous commenter on a Reddit thread asking people why they weren’t on Facebook. “Every service it claims to provide, I already have, without me, my friends and family having our privacy compromised and sold to every comer.”

    Since one is barraged with hundreds of online and offline advertisements a day, though, this may seem like a benign issue. But something more pernicious may be looming, said Patrick Flanery, whose forthcoming novel, “I Am No One,” deals explicitly with surveillance and data collection.

    “We are betraying things about our location and social relationships,” said Mr. Flanery, 40. “Even if it may only be used for corporations to sell us stuff, then that’s also assuming that the corporations collecting that data aren’t moving toward a different emphasis — that they’re only engaged in a kind of selling, rather than something that is a government by proxy.”

    As for the genuine, not-by-proxy government, our fears about its intrusion — which reached their zenith after Edward Snowden’s revelations about National Security Agency practices in 2013 — may have diverted attention from purely corporate oversight of our online habits. We are so focused on casting the N.S.A. as a modern-day Stasi that we have become less suspicious of Facebook, Twitter and the like, except when news articles crop up about their collaboration with the government.

    With the phrase “vulnerable attack surface to the world,” the Reddit user suggested another problem beyond Orwellian surveillance: We are now one another’s Big Brother. Social media accounts further expose oneself to hackers or, via a single tone-deaf misstep, a global public shaming.

    Yet even outside of these obviously dangerous waters, releasing an identity into the digital world remains discomfiting to some. Once your data is online, it no longer belongs wholly to you; subject to reposting and comments, the data you generate gets tossed into the Internet’s melting pot.

    Mr. Flanery, who joined Facebook in 2007 but now maintains only a public page, said he was initially unconcerned about what he posted because he was judicious about whose friend requests he accepted. But as his roster of connections expanded, he became more cautious. “I was posting willy-nilly and commenting and being quite free, as if I was talking to a closed circle of friends,” he said. “It was only gradually that I began to realize the visibility of my posts on other people’s pages, to a body whose makeup I couldn’t police.”

    Not only can information circulate beyond intended recipients, but people like Isabel Howe, 33, the executive director of the Authors League Fund in New York, find the one-size-fits-all approach to social networks too unwieldy for their personalities. “I wouldn’t call myself a secretive person,” she said. “But I do want the freedom to vary my level of self-exposure according to circumstance.”

    One can, of course, activate stringent privacy measures, set up alternative accounts for specific relationships (like one that excludes co-workers) or not post anything and simply “lurk.” But that’s a headache, and not foolproof; another user can still tag or refer to your avatar in a way that feels more invasive than merely naming you.

    “It was making me hate everyone,” Ms. Moshfegh, who closed her Facebook and Twitter accounts before her book came out, said in a phone interview.

    “I don’t know anybody who comes across in any kind of positive way on social media,” she said. “It made me feel bad, like there was a standard for living that I didn’t even know about, and that I hated so much that, if I ever had to be in touch with that standard, I was going to kill somebody.”

    The blatant desire for recognition is what most irritated her. “It seemed like everybody wants to be a celebrity,” Ms. Moshfegh said. “As soon as anybody started to know who I was, being on Facebook was so incredibly tacky.”

    Ms. Moshfegh has the advantage, it must be noted, of a professional team behind her to publicize her efforts. Likewise, it’s no great sacrifice when someone of George Clooney’s stature swears off social media, as he has little to gain and much to lose from it. But for a person in the early stages of a career dependent on gaining attention, whether one is a literary novelist or an entrepreneur, to do so is a genuine risk.

    Ms. Moshfegh, though, pointed to some of the pitfalls of being an active social networker. “I remember putting in my name to see what people were saying on Twitter about me a lot, and occasionally finding something negative and being really upset by it,” she said.

    And not being on social media can, in fact, yield brand-building benefits, especially for an artist.

    As hoi polloi shamelessly promote themselves, bestow disingenuous praise upon colleagues in hopes of receiving it in return and peck out snarkily hashtagged jokes during awards shows, the person who remains offline accrues mystique and is viewed as nobly intentioned, an elusive object of fascination rather than an accessible subject of self-glorification. Who knows how they’re spending their time? Likely working hard for some transcendent and paradigm-shifting purpose, their online absence suggests.

    But post a tweet, and everyone knows what you’re doing at that moment: idly looking at a screen, chasing after notice.